Best program to develop a new adventure to be used with SCUM

General chat related to ScummVM, adventure gaming, and so on.

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eriktorbjorn
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Post by eriktorbjorn »

iPwnzorz wrote:I'm sure I've seen MI4 in Game recently... I better shut up before this turns into one of those long, tedious forum debates.
They've re-released some of their older games, at least in Europe. I've seen Sam & Max, Full Throttle and The Dig fairly recently in stores. I've also seen some of their non-adventures, like Outlaws. I wonder if the re-release still has that nice music as audio tracks.

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JonWW
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Post by JonWW »

You would think Lucasarts could use ScummVM to re-release collections of their games on different game systems. Sierra used DOSBOX for their re-releases so why not. It could be beneficial for ScummVM as well if Lucasarts would submit all the bug fixes they find, but you know they most likely wouldn't. Would be nice to play Lucasarts adventure games on Wii

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Post by iPwnzorz »

Hmmm, didn't Revolution release SVM with Broken Sword once?

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Post by PsYcO »

eriktorbjorn wrote:
iPwnzorz wrote:I'm sure I've seen MI4 in Game recently... I better shut up before this turns into one of those long, tedious forum debates.
They've re-released some of their older games, at least in Europe. I've seen Sam & Max, Full Throttle and The Dig fairly recently in stores. I've also seen some of their non-adventures, like Outlaws. I wonder if the re-release still has that nice music as audio tracks.
you sure they weren't in the pre-owned bin? or even heavily reduced?

i always assumed that once the store had bought them from the producers that was that, and the makers of the games didn't get a penny there after, for that batch at least.

though, i highly doubt that there still in print, at least in single or double box's i would assume that there would be a few games on one disc.

also, without emulation or scummvm, it is incredibly hard to get most games running on modern machines(was difficult at release as well), im sure company's know of this, so i doubt they would bother re-releasing, without some kind of XP support. the cost to employ the factory's to produce them, in all probability would be more than that of what they would get in return. quite a big risk if you ask me, one not worth taking.

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Post by clem »

PsYcO wrote: you sure they weren't in the pre-owned bin? or even heavily reduced?
In front of me, lying, two DVD cases: CoMI, FT (both german). Copyright on the back says 1997-2007. Nope, not pre-owned, both acquired in outlets of large retail chains, shrinkwrapped.

Smallprint reads Activision, so I guess they distribute it.

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Post by eriktorbjorn »

PsYcO wrote: you sure they weren't in the pre-owned bin? or even heavily reduced?
Well, they weren't on the top-ten shelf, but as far as I could tell they weren't pre-owned either, and I know that some of the adventure games were re-released from discussions on other forums, like this one or this one. They're both pretty recent. The big surprise (to me) was Outlaws, and I saw that one in two different stores.
PsYcO wrote: though, i highly doubt that there still in print, at least in single or double box's i would assume that there would be a few games on one disc.
The ones I saw were in DVD cases, with one game each. I did see a Sam & Max / Day of the Tentacle bundle some years ago, but this time it was just Sam & Max.
PsYcO wrote: also, without emulation or scummvm, it is incredibly hard to get most games running on modern machines(was difficult at release as well), im sure company's know of this, so i doubt they would bother re-releasing, without some kind of XP support. the cost to employ the factory's to produce them, in all probability would be more than that of what they would get in return. quite a big risk if you ask me, one not worth taking.
Sam & Max and Full Throttle were updated by Aaron Giles to run on Windows a few years ago, and I'm told there was a Windows version of The Dig already. The Curse of Monkey Island was always a Windows game, so I guess there's a good chance it runs on Windows XP. That's probably why they're re-released every now and then, while they older games aren't.

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Post by PsYcO »

clem wrote:
PsYcO wrote: you sure they weren't in the pre-owned bin? or even heavily reduced?
In front of me, lying, two DVD cases: CoMI, FT (both german). Copyright on the back says 1997-2007. Nope, not pre-owned, both acquired in outlets of large retail chains, shrinkwrapped.

Smallprint reads Activision, so I guess they distribute it.
interesting...

a little question though, does that meen in 2008 the copyright expires?

activision doesn't seem to have any info on there web page though... weird

looks like adventure games are making a come back, excellent:)

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Post by iPwnzorz »

PsYcO wrote:
clem wrote:
PsYcO wrote: you sure they weren't in the pre-owned bin? or even heavily reduced?
In front of me, lying, two DVD cases: CoMI, FT (both german). Copyright on the back says 1997-2007. Nope, not pre-owned, both acquired in outlets of large retail chains, shrinkwrapped.

Smallprint reads Activision, so I guess they distribute it.
interesting...

a little question though, does that meen in 2008 the copyright expires?

activision doesn't seem to have any info on there web page though... weird

looks like adventure games are making a come back, excellent:)
No, copyright usually lasts 30 years.

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Post by eriktorbjorn »

PsYcO wrote: a little question though, does that meen in 2008 the copyright expires?
It probably just means that 2007 was the last year where they made any changes to it, e.g. by re-packaging it.

Similarly, the Bash reference manual was last updated in 2002, and is "Copyright (C) 1991-2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.", but I doubt the FSF have given up copyright on it.

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Post by eriktorbjorn »

iPwnzorz wrote: No, copyright usually lasts 30 years.
A lot longer than that, surely? In the United States, it lasts the copyright holder's lifetime, plus 70 years. If the copyright holder is a company, it lasts 120 years after creation or 95 years after publication, whichever is shortest.

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Post by PsYcO »

has *anythings* copyright run out yet?

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Post by clem »

PsYcO wrote:has *anythings* copyright run out yet?
Shakespeare. :)

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eriktorbjorn
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Post by eriktorbjorn »

PsYcO wrote:has *anythings* copyright run out yet?
A lot of books and music, for one thing.

Movies are a much more recent phenomenon - they celebrated the 100th anniversary some time in the nineties - but supposedly some of the early ones have entered the public domain. The copyright law has changed a number of times, and you usually don't restore copyright once it has run out, though that has happened.

Computer programs... well, the first digital computers appeared in the early forties so I guess it's possible, though probably not particularly exciting unless you're a historian. There were programmable devices before that, of course, such as the Jacquard loom and Babbage's analytical engine, though it seems the latter was never actually built.

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Post by jumnle »

eriktorbjorn wrote:
PsYcO wrote: also, without emulation or scummvm, it is incredibly hard to get most games running on modern machines(was difficult at release as well), im sure company's know of this, so i doubt they would bother re-releasing, without some kind of XP support. the cost to employ the factory's to produce them, in all probability would be more than that of what they would get in return. quite a big risk if you ask me, one not worth taking.
Sam & Max and Full Throttle were updated by Aaron Giles to run on Windows a few years ago, and I'm told there was a Windows version of The Dig already. The Curse of Monkey Island was always a Windows game, so I guess there's a good chance it runs on Windows XP. That's probably why they're re-released every now and then, while they older games aren't.
I bought my copy of Sam & Max Hit the Road last week, and it was new, with a 2007 copyright date. From their older games, they have rereleased Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis too, I saw it some months ago along with COMI, Full Throttle , The Dig and Grim Fandango.

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Post by iPwnzorz »

eriktorbjorn wrote:
iPwnzorz wrote: No, copyright usually lasts 30 years.
A lot longer than that, surely? In the United States, it lasts the copyright holder's lifetime, plus 70 years. If the copyright holder is a company, it lasts 120 years after creation or 95 years after publication, whichever is shortest.
Well it might just be over here then, I remember Robinsons used music from 1970 or something a while back for an advert because the copyright ran out.

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