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since noth can't be supported here are others
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olki
ScummVM Developer


Joined: 21 Sep 2005
Posts: 36
Location: Cardiff, UK
 

http://sourceforge.net/projects/freecnc

Pretty much dead though.

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Post Wed Jan 04, 2006 12:54 am 
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fingolfin
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Joined: 21 Sep 2005
Posts: 1466
 

quote:
Originally posted by db92
1) i only pay in EUR currency and
2)if i were to pay such a thing, i would just pay another experienced guy to do that, ur waaay too expensive


ROTFL

Riiiight. You don't really know how much an experienced well-trained programmer is paid, right? Especially one skilled at reverse engineering? Not talking about the problem finding one of those experienced with this kind of project (lack of that experience easily adds a couple more months to the project, and a proportional amount of money)... I think I actually know a lot of them Smile.

That said, I initially wanted to complain that sev is ruining the market with his low prices... Smile.
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Post Wed Jan 04, 2006 9:56 am 
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clem



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 2185
 

for 20,000 $ you could probably BUY the source of a 10yr old adventure game (maybe you could even buy the rights to the data files?)

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Post Wed Jan 04, 2006 1:10 pm 
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fingolfin
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Joined: 21 Sep 2005
Posts: 1466
 

Yes, with $20000 you might indeed be able buy the source, at least in some cases. Or rather, you could use it to pay the lawyer who determines the legal state of a the source Smile

The problem with unclear legal status due to sublicenses given to distributors, use of licensed libraries etc. caused major problems; companies which were interested in giving us the source didn't do it because it would cost them $$$ to make sure they actually were *allowed* to give us the source to their own programs...

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Post Wed Jan 04, 2006 6:54 pm 
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pi



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 35
 

So seriously, how much would it cost to make clear the legal status of said sources? Maybe we should start a fundraise for that Wink

pi~

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Post Fri Jan 06, 2006 2:53 pm 
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eriktorbjorn
ScummVM Developer


Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 3298
 

quote:
Originally posted by pi
So seriously, how much would it cost to make clear the legal status of said sources? Maybe we should start a fundraise for that Wink


The only such case I've heard of was Blender, which apparently cost 100,000 EUR. That wasn't an adventure game, though...
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Post Fri Jan 06, 2006 4:39 pm 
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Ender
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Joined: 21 Sep 2005
Posts: 110
Location: Perth, Western Australia
 

It largely depends on whether you end up dealing with a company or individuals. Also, of course, whether you are a non-profit group like us... or a company that already has legal staff on retainer. But as with anything, you could always spend more money.

The example below could take from 3-12 months for us. Paying someone $10,000 to go and do it would probably take far less time :)

1. If the developer of a game is no longer in operation, the first step is trying to determine if the rights have defaulted to anyone. A publisher, they may have been included as assets in a takeover or split, they may have defaulted to the authors. This usually involves hunting down long-lost developers in weird and exotic locations doing jobs that can be completely unrelated to computers. And then trying to get in contact with them!


Of course, that is merely the opening volley of what could be a long line of investigations. On the other side, the main use of money apart from paying someone to do all the hard work, is to grease the wheels. This is usually only needed when dealing with companies.. or licensed games (eg, based off a book written by a 3rd party - you'll have to negotiate with the owner of the IP too).

One last example:

Company E has obtained the rights to Game ? after acquiring Company W.
Most people at company E are quite happy to give the code away, but it never really manages to kick off. Since everyone is being payed wages at the company, doing anything costs money and thus must be justified. As soon as somebody thinks the rights situation might be complicated, it becomes too hard to justify and is thrown on the backburner.

This is all worked around, thanks to some very persistant people. After all the legal right issues with the game were resolved, one old problem still remains - who's going to pay the company E techs to retrieve the code from company Ws backup tapes? Well, actually, that isn't quite true, that last bit mainly comes down to silly company internal policies. Now getting around THOSE, that can cost $100,000 :)

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Post Sun Jan 08, 2006 3:42 am 
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pi



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 35
 

Well, that sounds encouraging, doesn't it Smile
Thanks for this insightful explanation, though.

pi~

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Post Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:26 pm 
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cappuchok



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 131
 

Company E. Company W. There's a clue in there, somewhere. Smile

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Post Tue Jan 10, 2006 8:23 am 
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